Weekly Newsletter

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December 9-13, 2019

Posted by [email protected] on December 16, 2019 at 3:55 PM Comments comments (0)

MERRY (early) CHRISTMAS

I hope that everyone had a wonderful weekend. We certainly were blessed with some beautiful weather. Since I will not be sending out another newsletter before Christmas, I hope that everyone has a safe and blessed Christmas vacation. I look forward to a wonderful new year with all of you and all of your kids.

Just a few quick reminders:

 

  • The Primary Program is taking place on this upcoming Wednesday, December 18th at 6:00 PM. If your child has an acting part he/she must in the 3B classroom by 5:30. This will give us time to get these children into their costumes (provided by the school). All other students should be in the Church no later than 5:40. An announcement will be made for the children to proceed to our classroom at that time.
  • Our classroom Christmas party will take place on Thursday, December 19th in the afternoon. Thank you to Colleen and Katelyn for being such wonderful room parents and planning our classroom celebrations
  • We have an all school prayer service at 10:45 AM in the Church on Friday, December 20th. All families are welcome. We will conclude by singing Christmas carols and having an early dismissal is at 11:30 AM.

 

Math:

When your child was in second grade the students learned about picture graphs and bar graphs with single-unit scales. During our current unit, the students are reading scaled picture graphs and scaled bar graphs, extracting information, and solving one- and two-step addition and subtraction problems to compare categorical data. Their knowledge of skip counting and multiplication helps them understand how to read and create scaled graphs. As the unit continues, they will learn how to make scaled picture graphs and scaled bar graphs as well as how to draw conclusion from data and graphs.

This is an incredibly short unit, as it is only 4 lessons long. Therefore, we had a test on this unit at the end of the week. Continue to practice your child’s math facts as fact families! This will help him/her develop the confidence when working toward mastering different math skills!

 

Social Studies/Science:

WOHOO!!! The kids did a fabulous job presenting their research last week. The third graders were split into two separate groups and then presented their inventor and invention on the assigned day. Each student was responsible for sharing 2 interesting facts about his/her inventor and invention, showcasing the advertisement for the invention, and then displaying the model or diagram of the invention.

Ms. Schuenemann and I were so impressed with how great the kids were as an audience and how well they presented their research. It was very clear that the kids LOVED this unit!

I am in the process of putting all of the videos onto our secure youtube group. Make sure to check out the "Get In Touch" tab. The videos are slowly uploading, so thank you for your patience. Please note that these are all unlisted videos, meaning, the videos are only available if you have the link. If you would like me to remove your child's video, please email me and let me know.


Writing:

During our writing time the students spent time learning about subject-verb agreement. The students know that a verb (either action or linking) tells what is happening in a sentence. Verbs can be in the present, past, or future tense. After this review, they learned that verbs in the present tense have two forms and the correct form is dependent on whether the subject is singular or plural.

  For example: [Except for I], Add -s to a verb when the noun in the subject is singular (He asks the bank teller for help). You do not add -s to the verb when the noun in the subject is plural (People hear the noise in the cafeteria). We will continue practicing this over the next few weeks.

 

Literacy

The kids are really enjoying our newest book: Out of the Dust. As mentioned in my previous letter, this book generates a lot of interesting opinions and questions by students. It is a great book for discussion, and I encourage you to ask the following questions to your child at home.

 

  1. Billie Jo’s mother does not want her playing the piano, even though she was the one that taught her to play. Why do you think this is?
  2. There is a terrible dust storm that destroys a quarter of the crops on the storm? Why is this a problem for the family and what does Ma suggest they do about it?
  3. How is President Roosevelt trying to help families during the Great Depression?
  4. Is Billie Jo’s family wealthy, middle class, or poor? How can you tell? What do they do to help other people in their time of need?
  5. How does Billie Jo’s relationship with her father change after her mother passes away?

 

 

Religion:

In Chapter 13 the discussed the season of Advent. Advent is the season of our preparation for Christ’s coming: past, present, and future. The students learned that the four weeks of Advent prepare us to rejoice in the Incarnation. We know that the Son of God was made man to save us and to reveal the Father’s love for us. Make sure to ask your child about our weekly primary Advent prayer services to see how we can prepare our hearts for the coming of Christ.


Spelling:

Our newest spelling words are up and online. This is for Unit 3: Lesson 14. These words are r-controlled vowels (ar, or). Continue to use www.spellingcity.com as resource for your child’s weekly spelling list.

Here are our new words:

 

  • New Words: horse, mark, storm, market, acorn, artist, March, north, barking, stork, thorn, forest, chore, restore
  • Review Words: dark, story
  • Challenge Words: partner, fortune, lying, ability

 

 

In Conclusion:

Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.


Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

 

 

December 2-6, 2019

Posted by [email protected] on December 10, 2019 at 10:20 AM Comments comments (0)

Happy December

As we officially enter the winter season, we believe outdoor recess is an important and valuable part of each student’s day. Fresh air, exercise and time spent outside afford students a break from the structure of the classroom. Teachers agree that students perform best at school when they have an opportunity for outdoor play, so we try to get them out whenever possible.

As a unit, we wanted to send out a brief letter sharing the primary winter attire guidelines and rules. These winter attire expectations in place to keep kids safe, warm, dry, as well as prepared to play outdoors during the chilly winter weather.

Starting now and until further notice students must come to school with the following winter attire:

  • a winter coat
  • a winter hat (hat must cover ears)
  • winter mittens or gloves
  • snow pants
  • winter snow boots (not fashion boots)

Everyday the primary teachers will inform the children of what they must wear in order to play safely outside. If your child doesn’t have snow pants or boots when there is substantial snow on the ground, he/she will still go outside, but will be required to play on a designated part of the blacktop. If this occurs a note will be sent home with the child that day reminding him/her to bring appropriate attire for the following day. If this becomes a pattern, we'll call home to come up with a plan to help the child remember appropriate attire :)

Finally, please make sure your child’s name is on all items. You would be surprised how many pairs of black snow pants get sent to Lost and Found. Also, we recommend sending waterproof or spare gloves to school, as these get easily misplaced or wet during winter play.

On a different note, thank you to everyone who helped make the QP book fair such a success. :) In addition, thank you to those who purchased books for the 3B classroom. Your contributions are truly appreciated and help make our classroom library an engaging place for students to read and find books that they love.

Here is what we did in the 3B classroom this week:

 

Math

During our first few lessons on area the students learned its true definition: the number of unit squares needed to cover a region. This week the students reinforced their understanding of area by determining the area of square and rectangles. These lessons emphasized different techniques for determining area. The students used concrete examples in our classroom and used different manipulatives to better grasp the concept of area. It is important for the students to have concrete experiences with area before they solve more complex problems later in the year.

  Once we finished with our manipulatives we used the Distributive Property to break apart unknown facts into known facts. During the lesson the students learned that areas of rectangles can be used to model the Distributive Property of Multiplication. For example, by separating a 4 x 8 rectangles into a 4 x 5 rectangle and a 4 x 3 rectangle, the students were able to see the area of the 4 x 8 rectangle was equal to the sum of the areas of the two smaller rectangles. This is a very advanced concept that the students are grasping very quickly! I’m very impressed by their willingness to try new things and their determination to grasp challenging concepts.

  Toward the end of the previous week, we finished Unit 6 and looked ahead to Unit 7. Unit 7 is a very short unit, so we will test at the end of the week. Continue to practice your child’s math facts as fact families! This will help him/her develop the confidence when working toward mastering the above skill!

 

Science / Social Studies

The kids did a FABULOUS job finishing their posters this past week. The kids will be presenting their work on Wednesday and Thursday of this upcoming week. Both Erin and I will make sure to record the presentations so that you can all enjoy watching them from the comfort of your own homes :).

Important Reminder: All models are due by Tuesday, December 10. You can bring in the models starting on Tuesday; however, please don’t bring them in earlier. Late materials may affect a students’ grade. Thanks for your help!

 

Reading / Writing

Our newest language arts unit is Poetry. Often times poetry is thought of short excerpts or clips that rhyme or are based on nature. This week the students learned the poetry comes in many forms, including long, chapter books.

  As a class, we are reading a new chapter (poetry) book called Out of the Dust. In powerful and lyrical free verse, Billie Jo Kelby tells the story of her life on the Oklahoma prairie from the winter of 1934 through the autumn of 1935. Here is a description from Scholastic: “Despite the constant dust storms and the struggle to make ends meet, Billie Jo is happy with her life. She loves to play the piano, her mother is pregnant with a much-wanted child, and her father is determined to keep their farm and home. Then a terrible accident brings tragedy into Billie Jo’s life….Set against the backdrop of the Dust Bowl and the hardships faced by prairie families, the novel is a testament to the power of hope and the triumph of the human spirit.”

  This is a wonderful book; however, our main characters do experience many hardships over the course of the story. Every week I will send out detailed questions for you and your family. I encourage you to take the time to talk with your child about the book each week. I’m confident you’ll be impressed with their thoughtfulness and insight.


Religion:

In our current chapter the students are learning about the ways Catholics listen and talk to God in Prayer. During class this week I asked the students to think of the Church’s prayer as a great river. At the depths of this river, always flowing, is liturgical prayer: the Mass, the sacraments, and the Liturgy of the Hours. At every moment of every day, all across the world, this great river of prayer is always accessible.

The students learned that there are different forms or prayer: prayers of praise, thanksgiving, petition, intercession, and blessing. We use these forms of prayer to speak to God, loved ones, and the saints. We ask God to help our families and friends, we express gratitude, ask forgiveness for our mistakes, and ask for God’s blessings. I encourage you, as a family, to talk about these different forms of prayer. You could even write down different prayers for the different types of prayer and pray for them as a family.

Note about Mass on Thursday, December 12: December 12th is approaching, which is is the day in which we celebrate our dear Lady of Guadalupe throughout the world. The Spanish department would like to have each of our students bring a flower to school. We are planning to collect them at the lobby in the main entrance. When the school day starts, some of these flowers will be brought to mass and the rest of them will be taken in representing our school at the Feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe Mass at the CMC. The flowers will adorn the altar for that special Mass at the CMC. We believe that this is a beautiful way to celebrate our dear Lady of Guadalupe.


Spelling:

Our newest spelling words are up and online. These words are contractions. Contractions are not terribly difficult to spell; however, remember where to put the apostrophe can cause confusion. Extra practice at home is important. Continue to use www.spellingcity.com as resource for your child’s weekly spelling list.

Here are our new words:

  • New Words: I’d, he’s, haven’t, doesn’t, let’s, there’s, wouldn’t, what’s, she’s, aren’t, hasn’t, couldn’t, he’d, they’re
  • Review Words: can’t, isn’t
  • Challenge Words: we’re, weren’t, examined, mist


In Conclusion:

Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

 

Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

[email protected]

 

Love in Every Word, Respect in Every Action, Confidence in Every Heart.

 

 

 

November 18-22, 2019

Posted by [email protected] on November 25, 2019 at 4:55 PM Comments comments (0)

A Time of Thanks

With Thanksgiving right around the corner, I wanted to start this newsletter with a prayer of Thanksgiving that I first heard at my previous school. I loved it so much that I saved it and now share it every year in my Thanksgiving Newsletter:

 

Dear God,

Thank you for all your blessings and gifts to us. We thank you for the precious gift of family and friends, for all those who are here with us today, and those who are far away. Thank you for your abundance and grace and for being with us every single day. We thank you for showing us glimpses of heavenly beauty through the eyes of our loved ones, through nature, songs of praise, and even warm sunlight. We are grateful for the roof over our heads and a warm place to sleep every night. Thank you for all those you brought into our lives to lead us, to guide us, and to protect us.

Amen.


Since this upcoming week is incredibly short, I will not be posting a newsletter over Thanksgiving weekend. Our next newsletter will take place following the week of December 2nd. With this being said, if you have any questions regarding the events or learning activities during our short week, please don’t hesitate to email me.

Just a quick reminder, that the third graders will lead our school in a Prayer Service this upcoming Wednesday. We hope you can join!

 

Here are the (3B) parts for our Prayer Service on Wednesday:

  • Greeters: Abby Bourget, Michael Sharkey
  • Student Welcome: Oscar Kramer
  • Reading: Jack Kenney
  • Petitions: Will Caldera, Keira Farnia, Madeline Fredricks, Fallon Klein
  • Singers: Layla Basarich, Pryor Cary, Jack Newton, Sam Oyster

 

 

Here is what we did in third grade this week:


Guidance Class:

This week your child participated in a lesson from the Circle of Grace Catholic Safe Environment Program. The goal of this program is to educate and empower children and young people to actively participate in a safe environment for themselves and others. All grade levels will participate in the Circle of Grace program. The lesson focused on being able to understand and describe the concept of a Circle of Grace. Please feel free to review this lesson with your child.

Circle of Grace overview: https://vimeo.com/207836764


Math:

Unit Unit 5 the students used structure to compare multiplication equations. They learned how to apply their knowledge of structure to break apart or change complicated problems into simpler ones. During Unit 6, the students learned how to do this with problems dealing with area.

In the first few lessons of Unit 6, the students found the area of squares and rectangles. In the later portion of the week they learned how to find the area of irregular shapes. Irregular shapes can be decomposed into two or more non-overlapping regular figures, often rectangles. For example, in order to determine the area of an irregular shape that can be divided into rectangles, the students learned to find the area of each rectangle and then add the areas of all the rectangles.

These lessons, while complex and difficult, truly emphasize student knowledge and application. These lessons, and the growing complexity of the lessons in this unit, showcase students' fluency in multiplication, as well as their knowledge of area and geometric shapes. With that being said, it is critical for kids to feel confidence in their math facts in order to have true success with this unit. By this point in the year, students should be working toward mastery of their multiplication facts. Continue to practice them at home.


Social Studies / Science:

This past week the students learned about the importance of advertising and how ads can affect how an invention/product sells. Students looked at different examples of successful ads (for example: Nike--Just Do It / Skittles--Taste the Rainbow.) and noticed how ads are targeted toward different groups of people to try to get us (the public) to buy the product. The students then spent time creating advertisements for their inventors and inventions. I can’t wait for you to see the clever ads and slogans that your kids came up with. It’s clear we have quite a few kids with marketing genes in their bodies. Make sure to ask your child about his/her advertisement.

Make sure you are working on your child's invention model at home! :)


Religion:

This past week the students started practicing for our Christmas Pageant. All students will be performing the music and carols during the show. If your child was given a reading part for the Christmas Pageant, he/she is responsible for practicing lines at home. Most parts (with the exception of the storytellers) must be memorized. Since this is a primary pageant, not all third graders have roles this year. I assured each child that over the course of their primary careers, parts were given to each child. Be on the lookout over the next few weeks for more information regarding the Christmas Pageant.


Spelling:

Due to the short week we will NOT have a spelling list this week. With that being said, you can always use spelling city to check out the words for the upcoming week. The students will be looking at Unit 3: Lesson 12. Continue to use www.spellingcity.com as resource for your child’s weekly spelling list.


In Conclusion:

Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.


Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

[email protected]

Love in Every Word, Respect in Every Action, Confidence in Every Heart.

 

 

November 11-15, 2019

Posted by [email protected] on November 19, 2019 at 7:10 PM Comments comments (0)

Crazy Weather!

Wow! What crazy weather we’ve been having! This November has certainly felt more like December, with all the cold temperature and snow. Thank you for sending your child to school with appropriate outside attire! When snow is on the ground AND when the temperatures drop below freezing, we want the kids to be bundled up and safe.

  Quick note #1: our room parents will be sending out information regarding our Thanksgiving celebration in 3B within the next week. Please be on the lookout for ways that you can help out!

Quick note #2: the third graders will lead our school in a Prayer Service on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving. More information regarding reading/singing parts will go home later this week. We hope you can join!

 

Here is what we did in third grade this week:


Math:

This week the students continued to learn different strategies to use while multiplying and dividing. As mentioned last week, a multiplication table is a wonderful tool for students to use when searching for patterns in factors and products. During our lessons this week the students took what they knew about the multiplication table and applied it to solving word problems and also creating math stories.

Students were asked to recognize situations in which multiplication could be used to join equal groups, count objects in an array, or tell how many in all by using bar diagrams. The kids then translated the symbolic language of mathematics into writing their own math stories.

These lessons truly emphasized application and fluency within multiplication. Writing multiplication stories gives students the opportunity to improve their fluency in multiplication as they become adept in the linguistics of mathematics. These lessons demonstrated that students have mastered key mathematics principles and were able to tackle the challenges of not only solving word problems, but also write them!

It was a blast to see the kids work in their groups to create and then solve each other’s word problems. At the end of the week, I chose the most “challenging” math story that was created and we worked on solving it as a class. Make sure to ask your child to write his/her own math story! Give your child a math fact and have him/her create the story that centralizes around the numbers.

At home remember to practice your child’s math facts as fact families! This will help him/her develop the confidence when working toward mastering the above skill!


Reading/Writing:

The students are doing a great job writing their non-fiction pieces. Most of the students are finishing up their second drafts and will be peer editing this upcoming week. The students have had a blast writing their memoirs and I’ve loved reading some of the exciting adventures that these kids have experienced. This writing piece will take place through the first two weeks of December, so make sure to ask your child what memorable experience he/she is writing about in school!

This past week we finished reading Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. As mentioned last week, this story follows a young girl living in Japan who is affected by the radiation for the atomic bomb dropped in Hiroshima during World War II. Unfortunately, Sadako passes away from leukemia at the end of the story; however, her story has become an inspiration to people around the world about positivity, loving one’s family, and developing a sense of courage when all seems lost. Here are some questions you can ask your child to check for comprehension:

 

  1. Does Sadako finish making her paper cranes?
  2. What gift does Sadako’s mom, Mrs. Sasaki, give Sadako before she passes away?
  3. The Sasaki celebrates the holiday of O’Bon. What is O’Bon and what holiday in Mexico does it relate to?
  4. What did the country of Japan do to honor Sadako?

 


Social Studies/Science:

The students are working SO hard on their inventor projects! This past week the students spent their time researching their inventor and his/her invention. Ms. Schuenemann and I shared different websites with your children via our google drive. Each child then spent time researching different information regarding their inventor. Each student is responsible for answering a minimum of 10 questions regarding the inventor/invention:

 

  1. When was the inventor born?
  2. Where did he/she grow up?
  3. What is the invention and what does it do?
  4. What are some of the materials that he/she used to build his/her invention?
  5. What inspired your inventor to create his/her invention?
  6. What makes this invention important?
  7. In your opinion, what was the greatest challenge the inventor faced when making the invention?
  8. How did the invention change the world?
  9. How have people improved upon your inventor’s invention?
  10. List at least one fun fact about your inventor or his/her invention.

 

 

Thus far, the kids are all on task to completing their notecards on time! Should anyone not complete their notecards by next week, he/she may need to work on answering any left over questions at home. Make sure to check-in with your child when at home about how his/her research is going.


Religion:

 

This week the students started their newest chapter. Within Chapter 5 the students are learning different ways that the Church celebrates. The students learned that the celebration of the Eucharist is the Church’s most important form of worship. In the Eucharist, the Church remembers what Jesus said and did at the Last Supper and receives the Body and Blood of Christ.


Spelling:

This week the students are working on Unit 3: Lesson 11 for their spelling words. These words all follow the pattern of the vowel sound oi/oy. Make sure to use www.spellingcity.com as resource for your child’s weekly spelling list.

Here are our new words:

 

  • New Words: joy, point, voice, join, oil, coin, noise, spoil, toy, joint, boy, soil, choice, boil
  • Review Words: come, are
  • Challenge Words: poison, destroy, athletes, improve

 


In Conclusion:

Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

[email protected]

Love in Every Word, Respect in Every Action, Confidence in Every Heart.

 


November 4-8, 2019

Posted by [email protected] on November 11, 2019 at 6:35 PM Comments comments (0)

Celebrating our Veterans

Thank you to everyone who came and helped us honor our veterans today! This past week the students discussed all of the ways that we can thank the men and women for their service. While we should be showing thanks everyday, Veteran’s Day is a great day for us to think creatively about how to give back to those who have protected our country.

  In addition to discussing how we can give thanks, a wonderful book called The Poppy Lady: Moina Belle Michael was shared with me the other day. The book follows Moina Belle Michael, who is a schoolteacher from Georgia. She wanted to help the soldiers who entered World War One: “Some of the soldiers were her students and friends. Almost single-handedly, Moina worked to establish the red poppy as the symbol to honor and remember soldiers. And she devoted the rest of her life to making sure the symbol would last forever. Thanks to her hard work, that symbol remains strong today.” (book synopsis) If you’re interested in learning more about the book, check out the following video! It’s a mini trailer for the book. It’s definitely worth the four-minute viewing and would be a fun video to share with your kids: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5ftFEFfKUrU

Here’s what we did in third grade this week:


Math:

This week the students finished our fifth unit of the year! Unit 5 focuses on applying strategies to achieve fluency with multiplication and division facts within 100. The work in this unit moves students forward and toward knowing (from memory) all products of two 1-digit numbers by the end of third grade.

On Monday the students used the multiplication table and the Distributive Property to find patterns in factors and products. For example, by working with the table, students readily see patterns emerge from all multiples of 2 and multiples of 9. The students used their knowledge of facts (and the Distributive Property) to see these patterns.

Becoming adept in the use of the multiplication table gives students another tool to use, not only to see patterns but also to help them become more proficient in recalling multiplication facts. Here are some questions (with answers) that you can ask your child. These questions will help him/her review what was learned this week:

How can a multiplication table help you find products that equal 48 when added together? (ANSWER: The table helps me see that as one factor increases, the other factor decreases. In [6 x 0] + [6 x 8] = 48, the sum of the products is 48. In [6 x 1) + [6 x 7] = 48, the sum of the products is also 48.

When looking at a multiplication table, what do you notices of multiples of 2 or 4? (ANSWER: When multiplying by 2, the product increases by 2 as the other factor increases. When multiplying by 4, the product increases by 4 as the other factor increases. Also, all of the products are even numbers)

What pattern do you see in the columns and rows of a multiplication table when 0 is a factor? (ANSWER: When 0 is a factor, the product is 0)

At home remember to practice your child’s math facts as fact families! This will help him/her develop the confidence when working toward mastering the above skill!


Social Studies/Science:

During the months of November and December, the students will be completing a monthly project within our social studies and science units. Both our social studies and science units focus on the different influential and important people, inventors, and inventions that helped make our country (and world) great. In Social Studies the students will travel back to the formation of our country and learn about how different inventions, tools, and technology helped America thrive. In Science, the students will learn about the engineering process.

Ms. Schuenemann and I worked together to come up with a project that encourages and teaches good researching skills, writing, independent thinking, and personal creativity. During this project the students will research one inventor and one invention that he/she invented. The kids will research their inventor’s life, education, and how he/she came up with his/her important invention.

On Friday the kids were sent home with a packet of information regarding the project. It mentions how this is BOTH an in-class and at-home project. While at school the students will research the inventors and inventions, takes notes on their findings, create an advertisement for the invention, and also make a poster showcasing what was learned. At home the students will be required to EITHER make a model of the invention chosen or draw a diagram of the invention.

While you look through the packet of information, keep in mind that this project was designed mostly to be an at-school project. We will be providing the posters, materials for the advertisements, books, and educationally appropriate websites for research. The only reason why a child would need to do the research, poster, or advertisement at home is if he/she is not able to stay focused enough to get it done in class OR if the inventor is too advanced for our school-wide database. Should that problem arise, either Ms. Schuenemann or I will communicate with you directly.

Ms. Schuenemann and I have already heard so many wonderful comments, ideas, and creative thoughts coming from the mouths of the kids. We know this is going to be a project to remember.


Religion:

This week the students learned about the four marks of the Church, which are its special characteristics. At Mass, as we pray the Nicene Creed, we profess our belief in the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic church. The four words (one, holy, catholic, apostolic) are the four marks or chief characteristics of the Church. They stand out as benchmarks when Catholics demonstrate a oneness that welcomes diversity and works for unity with other Christians.

We also talked about how the popes and bishops are the successors of the Apostles. A fun activity that you can do at home is the have the kids create Apostle “trading cards.” As a family you can give your child 12 trading card-sized rectangles cut from poster board. Together, as a family, design a trading card for each of Jesus’ twelve Apostles. Each trading card should include the name of the Apostle, an illustration, and any additional biographical information. As a family, you can also talk about how each Apostle helped the Church grow.


Reading:

Our newest reading and writing unit focuses on the non-fiction genre. WHAT IS NON-FICTION? Nonfiction books tell us facts and information about the world around us. They can cover any topic, so long as it’s about something that really happened or something that really exists! Often times we associate nonfiction texts as textbooks; however, they can come as picture books, newspapers, magazines, chapter books, etc. This month the students will be reading two books: one chosen by me and one chosen by them! This past week we read the beginning of the chapter book “Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes.” This book is based on the life of a real little girl who lived in Japan from 1943-1955. She was in Hiroshima when the United States Air Force dropped an atom bomb on that city in an attempt to end World War II. Ten years later, she passed away as a result of radiation from the bomb. While this story has moments of sadness, Sadako’s courage made her a heroine to children in Japan. Below are some questions you can ask your child to check for reading comprehension this week:

  • What is Sadako’s favorite sport/activity? How do you know this is her favorite sport/activity?
  • What is Peace Day and why does Sadako celebrate it?
  • What happens when Sadako runs in her relay race (both positive and negative)?
  • Why do you think Sadako refuses to tell her parents that she is feeling dizzy?


Writing:

To connect to our nonfiction reading unit, this month the students are writing personal narratives, or memoirs, in class. Each child will be asked to pick a very specific moment or experience in his/her life that provokes strong memories, feelings, and senses. We will be using the writing process to pre-write, write a first draft, edit, and ultimately publish our work. As a family, you can discuss some memorable moments or experiences. This will help your child generate a good topic for his/her personal narrative.


Spelling:

Please make sure to encourage your child to practice his/her spelling list every night of the week. Even if your child finishes his/her spelling packet, the words should still be practiced every night. Continue to use www.spellingcity.com as resource for your child’s weekly spelling list. This week we are on Unit 2: Lesson 10, which focuses on the “a” vowel sound in the words talk and crawl.


In Conclusion:

Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.


Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

[email protected]

Love in Every Word, Respect in Every Action, Confidence in Every Heart.

 

 

October 21-November 1

Posted by [email protected] on November 4, 2019 at 6:15 PM Comments comments (0)

A Long Break followed by Halloween

I hope that everyone enjoyed the long fall break that we had in October. I didn’t write a newsletter for that week, as the week was so short. With that being said, we certainly had a lot of fun celebrating over the course of the short week. 

This past week the students had a BLAST at our Halloween party. Thank you so much to our two incredible room parents, Colleen Kenney & Katelyn Klein, for organizing such a fun event!

Just a reminder that the weather is getting chillier. Please help remind your child to bring his/her hats and gloves to school. As a primary unit, the kids must have hats and gloves if the temperature gets below freezing. I have some spare items at school, but it’s always better if the kids have their own items. Also, boots and snow pants are required once snow appears on the ground. Let’s work together to make sure that every child has a fun and warm recess. Thanks!

This week the students finished their first Positive Puzzle of the school year. The students will be voting how how they want to celebrate their good behavior.  Once a decision is made, I will email you all with a date for our celebration, as well as more information! 

Here is what we did in third grade this week:


Math:

Over the last two weeks, the students finished their fourth math unit of the school year. The kids reviewed the unit material and then took a test at the end of the week, Throughout this unit, students have learned that multiplication and division are related operations by writing fact families and by using known multiplication facts to learn division facts. This week the students used what they knew about multiplication and division facts to solve multi-step word problems and problems with hidden questions.

The students are familiar with problems with hidden questions, as they were introduced to them during our second unit of the school year. While problems with hidden questions can be challenging, looking at these types of problems advances students understanding of everyday problems that can be solved with different operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division). The kids also develop good thinking habits that continue to help them persevere in working through problems, making sure to have a plan to solve and check problems!

Here is a sample question with a hidden problem: Two girls and two boys went to the festival. The total cost of their tickets was $20. Each child paid the same amount for a ticket. What was the cost of each ticket?

The first thing that we do is reread at the problem. Then we answer the following questions: What do I need to find? What do I know? What’s my plan for solving the problem? What else can I try if I get stuck? How can I check that my solution makes sense?

In the above question I first need to figure out how many children are attending the festival. I know that there are 2 boys and 2 girls, so I can add 2 + 2 = 4 to establish that there are four children. From there I can solve $20 ÷ 4 (children) = $5 per ticket.

Here is a sample word question with a hidden problem that you can try at home. Encourage your child to use the strategies learned at school: There are 5 players on a basketball team. In a game, 4 players scored 6 points each. The team scored a total of 34 points. How many points did the other player score?

At home remember to practice your child’s math facts as fact families! This will help him/her develop the confidence when working toward mastering the above skill!


Social Studies:

The last two weeks of social studies have been filled with excitement and new learning opportunities.

This week the students learned about a fishing community in Japan called Ine (EE-nay). The students learned that people around the world build their communities near natural resources. During our lessons, we “traveled” to Ine and learned about the plants and animals that live in the ocean and how they are important to the people who live there.

We also MADE paper before our fall break. The students have learned many different ways that we can recycle and reuse different materials. We took recycled paper and ripped the paper into small bits and placed them into a blender with water. This created our pulp mixture. Once our pulp mixture was created we put the pulp into our wooden mold. The mold included a screen and base to prevent the pulp from exiting the mold. After the pulp was evenly distributed throughout the mold, we lifted the mold up and waited until most of the water had drained from the new paper sheet. We then used a sponge to soak up the water.

This past week the students completed our unit on communities and geography. We did a review in class on and then took our test. The test average for both 3A and 3B was a 93%, which is fabulous! Make sure to ask your child how he/she did.

Our next unit focuses on the history of different communities. We will learn about Native American communities, the settlers of Jamestown, and also early inventors who developed key inventions for our country. This will lead nicely into our inventor’s unit in science later this winter.


Science with Ms. Schuenemann:

In science this week, students learned that not just people can change the traits of animals over time- nature can too! When the environment changes, like the introduction of a new predator, some organisms survive well and reproduce, some have traits that help them survive less well, and some cannot survive at all. Over time, most offspring will be born with the traits that help them survive well. This is because offspring inherit their traits from their parents- and the ones that survive well and reproduce!

To help with their understanding, students carried out an investigation by using a model to simulate the introduction of a predator species on Lizard Island. Students simulated multiple generation of lizards, analyzing and interpreting the data after each one. They used this data to engage in an argument from evidence to support their claim about how the offspring change from the original lizards.


Reading / Writing:

This week the students completed our mystery unit. The students read a variety of different mystery stories and also wrote incredible mysteries based on the Mysteries of Harris Burdick. I will be printing these stories off to be laminated and sent home. In the meantime, check out the hallway, as many of the stories are in the hallway.

 

Religion:

Throughout the course of each year, the Church celebrates the saving work of Jesus Christ in a cycle of feasts and seasons. For example, during the Advent and Christmas seasons, the Church recalls and celebrates the mystery of the Incarnations, from the Annunciation to Epiphany. These feasts commemorate the beginning of our salvation story.

This week the students learned about the different seasons of the Church. In order they are Advent, Christmas, Ordinary Time, Lent, Three Days, Easter, and Ordinary Time. If you, as an adult, want to read information regarding the liturgical year, please read chapter 1168 in a Catechism of the Catholic Church. That paragraph, as well as the paragraphs that follow explain the different celebrations as the explanations behind each season.


Spelling:

Last week’s list of spelling words was very challenging as it dealt with silent letters. While this week’s list is not quite as challenging, it does still require at home practice. Please make sure to encourage your child to practice his/her spelling list every night of the week. Even if your child finishes his/her spelling packet the words should still be practice every night. Thanks! Continue to use www.spellingcity.com as resource for your child’s weekly spelling list. Here are our new words: 

  • New Words: clown, round, bow, cloud, power, crown, thousand, crowd, sound, count, powder, blouse, frown.
  • Review Words: house, found
  • Challenge Words: mountain, coward, applause, familiar 


In Conclusion:

Make sure to check out our photo gallery for more pictures from this week and last week (since we had a short week this acts as a newsletter for two weeks). Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.


Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

[email protected]

Love in Every Word, Respect in Every Action, Confidence in Every Heart.


October 14-18, 2019

Posted by [email protected] on October 24, 2019 at 12:00 AM Comments comments (0)

A Fun Week Followed by a Short Week

Just a reminder that this upcoming week will be a short one for QP, as we do not have school on Thursday or Friday. As a result, we will not have a newsletter for next week.

Also, we will be celebrating Halloween on Thursday, October 31. Kids should NOT come dressed in their costumes. We have a designated time for the kids to change into their costumes after lunch. The primary grades will walk around the school starting at 12:30 for a parade! Please stop by if you’re free. Also, if you signed up to donate treats or supplies for our Halloween party, please remember to bring those in! (Thanks in advance!) As a reminder, please use good judgment when picking out your child’s costumes. Keep in mind the following guidelines:

  • They must not interfere with regular activities.
  • Students must be able to sit and walk without problems.
  • Costumes should not cause problems using the restroom.
  • Costumes are not to be offensive or have any reference to violence (including blood).\
  • No costume, accessory, or prop can resemble any type of weapon (guns, knives, etc.) real or fake.


Here is what we did in third grade this week:

 

Math:

In our previous math units, students learned multiplication facts. While we are still learning and working toward mastering these skills, we are moving forward to our newest math unit: division! This week the students were introduced to division through multiplication. Multiplication and division have an inverse relationship. Multiplication forms equivalent sets, and division separates equivalent sets of objects into equal groups.

During our first unit of the school year the students saw how arrays could be used to represent multiplication. This week the students saw that the total number of items is the same as the product of the related multiplication equation(s) and the dividend of the related division equation(s). Understanding the inverse relationship between the two operations helps students realize other critical concepts in mathematics and allows them to engage in more rigorous computations.

Division can cause some frustration for students. Please remind your child that we will be working toward mastering our fact families over the course of the ENTIRE school year. I do not expect your child to have his/her multiplication and division facts memorized by the end of this unit. This unit is merely organized to teach students how to think abstractly and develop a larger conceptual understanding of division.

At home remember to practice your child’s math facts as fact families! This will help him/her develop the confidence when working toward mastering the above skill!


Social Studies:

What are natural resources and why are they so important to our survival? These two questions were the focus of our lessons this week. We started the week by thinking about all of the things we use that come from nature. For example, the paper and pencil we write with both come from trees. Nature also provides us with the water we drink and the air we breathe.

We learned that natural resources are things found in nature that people often use to make other things. We talked extensively about trees during our studies this week. The students learned that the largest living thing in the world is the General Sherman Tree, a sequoia tree in California. The students were amazed that the tree is over 2,000 years old! We learned that trees are important to people’s lives because their leaves absorb carbon dioxide from the air and change it into oxygen that people and animals need to breathe.

In addition to the above information, the students learned the difference between renewable and nonrenewable resources. We learned that wind, water from precipitation, and sunlight are all examples of renewable resources. Whereas, materials mined from the earth, such as oil and coal are nonrenewable resources. We then used our higher order thinking schools to discuss what might happen when people use up all of the nonrenewable resources. We thought up of potential alternatives to using these resources and also talked about how it’s important to research new ways to find energy solutions.

  • Here are some questions you can ask your child to check for comprehension at home:
  • How do people and businesses use natural resources? (Example: Water is used for swimming, fishing, and transportation. Trees are used to build houses and furniture, and make paper)
  • What is the environment? (The air, water, land, and all living things around us)
  • How might people get resources they need but do not have? (They can buy them from people who have them)
Due to the short nature of the upcoming week, I sent home a study guide with the children on Thursday, October 17. Our Social Studies Test for Unit 2 is not until October 29th. Please make sure you are helping your child study, as these are still new concepts. While we go over the information in detail, extra reinforcement is still very important.


Spelling:

Due to our short week, we will NOT have a spelling test this upcoming week. With that being said, I have still updated our upcoming spelling list on www.spellingcity.com. Our newest list of words are all words with unexpected consonant spellings. This list of words always proves to be difficult for students, so please make sure you are spending extra time studying the words! Below are our new spelling words. The test will be on Friday, November 1.

  • Spelling List: itch, wreck, knee, patch, wrap, knot, watch, knife, stretch, write, knew, knock, match, wrong
  • Review Words: know, catch
  • Challenge Words: wrinkle, knuckle, advice, serious


In Conclusion:

Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

[email protected]

Love in Every Word, Respect in Every Action, Confidence in Every Heart.

October 7-11, 2019

Posted by [email protected] on October 14, 2019 at 6:20 PM Comments comments (0)

A Week of Mindfulness and Young Americans

Hello 3B Families,

Thank you to everyone who helped with our early childhood/primary mindfulness program, as well as our Young Americans celebration. The primary students visited the 4th-8th grade dress rehearsal on Friday and were amazed by all of their hard work.

As you may have noted, QP is closed on Thursday, October 24 and Friday, October 25. I know several parents are pulling their kids for extended vacation earlier in the week (how fun!). If you are pulling your child early from school I wanted to send a quick reminder regarding our school’s missed homework policy. QP’s official policy is that we do not send homework ahead of time for vacation days. This is due to the fact that our day-to-day procedures, as well as classroom lessons, vary based on the student understanding of different content/materials. If your child is missing any day next week, I will plan to collect missed work for him/her to complete upon his/her return. They will be given the number of days gone to complete the missed work. I hope this helps clarify any questions.

Just a reminder that we have parent-teacher conferences on Monday the 21 and Monday the 28. I look forward to seeing you all and discussing your child’s successes. The conference sign-up will be closing mid-week, so please make sure to sign up! 


Math:

In our previous math units, students learned multiplication facts. While we are still learning and working toward mastering these skills, we are moving forward to our newest math unit: division! This week the students were introduced to division through multiplication. Multiplication and division have an inverse relationship. Multiplication forms equivalent sets, and division separates equivalent sets of objects into equal groups.

During our first unit of the school year the students saw how arrays could be used to represent multiplication. This week the students saw that the total number of items is the same as the product of the related multiplication equation(s) and the dividend of the related division equation(s). Understanding the inverse relationship between the two operations helps students realize other critical concepts in mathematics and allows them to engage in more rigorous computations.

Division can cause some frustration for students. Please remind your child that we will be working toward mastering our fact families over the course of the ENTIRE school year. I do not expect your child to have his/her multiplication and division facts memorized by the end of this unit. This unit is merely organized to teach students how to think abstractly and develop a larger conceptual understanding of division.

At home remember to practice your child’s math facts as fact families! This will help him/her develop the confidence when working toward mastering the above skill!


Social Studies:

This week the students continued learning about different landforms across our Earth. This week we focused our time on our Earth’s Water. The students learned that more than 70 percent of Earth is covered by water. The water on our Earth is incredible. For example, oceans regulate temperature and supply moisture for rain. The students also discovered that only 3 percent of Earth’s water is fresh and that around two-thirds of Earth’s freshwater is found in glaciers and polar caps.

The students then looked at a variety of landform maps of the United States. The students studied state maps and the larger map of the United States. The students discovered the different colors on these maps represented different landforms (the Great Plains, the Colorado plateau, the Mississippi River, and the Rocky Mountains. The students were partnered up and were asked to make their own landform maps of the United States. Watch the video below to see their hard work!


Science (with Ms. Schuenemann):

This week, students embarked on a pretend fossil dig where they analyzed and interpreted data from fossils. Students examined fossils and gathered information about traits of these organisms of the past to infer what environments looked like long ago. Then, students used this evidence to engage in an argument and decided where some of the mystery fossils came from in the fossil dig based on their traits. This week, students will look at howfossils can tell us about what an organism looked like, the habitat they lived, and even what the organism ate!


Religion:

In our previous chapter the students learned about the beginning of the Church. This week the students learned about the Apostles who led the Church and about those who remained true followers of Jesus despite the risk of losing their lives.

One of the things that has kept the Church moving forward is its recalling that we are a pilgrim Church. During this journey we realize that “The Church is in history, but at the same time she transcends it. It is only with the eyes of faith that one can see her in her visible reality and at the same time in her spiritual reality as bearer of divine life.” (CCC770).

After the Apostles came bursting out of the upper room on Pentecost, it wasn’t long before opposition to the followers of the crucified Jesus of Nazareth intensified. Some Jewish leaders banned the use of his name. In addition, Greeks and Romans declared the Christians to be atheists because they would not honor the gods who protected their cities. Although the Church grew relatively quickly, the early Christians paid a high price for their faith. This week we prayed for the grace to continue to stand up to our faith and be enthusiastic disciples of Christ.


Writing:

This week the students worked tirelessly to finish their first drafts of their “Mysteries of Harris Burdick” writing prompts. I LOVE revising with the kids, as the stories are so inventive and creative. This upcoming week the children will work on writing their second drafts, as well as peer editing. Each child will ultimately pair up with another student in the class and go over each writing piece.


Reading:

The students are doing a wonderful job reading their group mystery books. The kids continue to amaze me with their ability to make inferences, discuss text-to-self connections, and draw conclusions based on character personalities and occurrences within the book.

I’ve jotted down some questions about the books that are being read in 3B. Keep in mind, that your child’s book may not be on this list. This is because the kids are mixed with 3A students and they might be reading different books in Ms. Schuenemann’s room. Make sure to ask your child the following questions about his/her book to help check for comprehension. They’re also great topic generators!

Sammy Keyes and the Hotel Thief

  • Who is Heather? Do Sammy and Heather get along?
  • What happened at the Heavenly Hotel that Sammy saw?
  • Where does Sammy live?
  • Describe Sammy’s grandma? Do they have a good relationship?
  • What happens when Sammy shares her information with the police?

Chasing Vermeer

  • Where are the letters delivered? And how many letters are there?
  • Why do you think each of the three people received the letter?
  • Describe Mrs. Hussey.
  • Why was Petra fascinated with Lo!, a strange book written by Charles Fort?
  • Why did Calder choose the picture on his cherished wooden box to fulfill Ms. Hussey’s art assignment?

Who Stole the Wizard of Oz

  • Becky and Toby are not just siblings...what makes their sibling relationship extra special?
  • What did Toby learn about how Checkerton was designed?
  • How did Mrs. McPhearson react when Toby asked about Gertrude Tobias?
  • Why is it so important to Becky that they find out who took the book? (after all, the police aren’t worried about it) 

A to Z Mysteries: The School Skeleton

  • The kids do a good job of eliminated suspects of stealing the skeleton. How di the kids eliminate Mr. Dillon and Mrs. Waters as suspects?
  • Ruth Rose thought that the gym teacher stole the skeleton. What was his alibi?
  • What clue was found in Josh’s locker?
  • What does Ruth Rose think the skeleton drawing and key mean? 

Bunnicula

  • This week something peculiar happened to a tomato in the kitchen: it turned white! Why do you think the tomato was white?
  • Bunnicula has some strange eating habits. What does he like to eat?
  • Most pets are purchased at a pet store...but not Bunnicula. Where did the Monroe family find Bunnicula?
  • What were some of the funny names the Monroe family wanted to name Bunnicula?


Spelling:

Continue to use www.spellingcity.com as a resource for your child.. Below are our new spelling words for this upcoming week:

  • Spelling List: three, scrap, street, spring, thrill, scream, strange, throw, string, scrape, spray, threw, strong, scratch
  • Review Words: they, think
  • Challenge Words: straight, scramble, illustrate, research


In Conclusion:

Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.


Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

[email protected]

Love in Every Word, Respect in Every Action, Confidence in Every Heart.


September 30-October 4, 2019

Posted by [email protected] on October 7, 2019 at 8:35 AM Comments comments (0)

A Field Trip, Fairy Tales, and Overall Fun Week 

Thank you to the parent chaperones who joined us on our field trip. We had an incredible time at Cave of the Mounds. The kids learned so much about the cave’s formation, sinkholes, and interesting cave facts. Even through the VERY rainy weather, we had a lots of smiling faces! While it may have been a rainy field trip day, we did get some beautiful weather one Friday, which benefited the kids as they ran the mile this past week! Thank you to those who joined.

Your child’s pictures from picture day were sent home earlier this week. Retakes take place on Friday, October 11. It sounds like some students have not received their photos and the orders were placed and checks cashed. Administration informed us to have parents call School Pics directly: 262-780-2901. Thank you!

A conference sign-up sheet was sent home to parents in the Sunday Knight News. Fall conferences will take place on Monday, October 21st after school and Monday, October 28th after school. Please note that report cards are not sent home for these conferences. These conferences are a way for you to learn how your child is adjusting to third grade. Report cards will go home in November. Please use the following link to sign up. http://https://www.signupgenius.com/go/4090d48aba82ca46-primary8

In other news, the Young Americans organization is visiting our school early next week. This does not directly affect our younger students, as this is an event for the 4th-8th graders. With that being said, on Wednesday, October 9th QP will be putting on their performances with the Young Americans. I strongly encourage you to attend and purchase tickets! I know you’ll be amazed at all that these kids can do!

Here is what we did in third grade this week:


Math:

This week the students spent time mastering The Distributive Property, as well as The Associative Property. They then took their Unit 3 test, which was our highest test score average so far (91%!). As you may have figured out, the Distributive Property states that a multiplication fact can be broken apart into the sum of other multiplication facts. This week, the students used arrays to understand the distributive property when dealing with larger math facts (9 x 8, 8 x 7, 6 x 12 etc.). This allows students to break apart larger multiplication problems into easier multiplication problems.

Students sometimes have a difficult time recalling the value of larger facts. For example 7 x 5. By using the Distributive Property the students can think of the larger problem as (5 x 5) + (2 x 5). Facts they have already learned.

When introducing this concept the other week, we first defined the word distribute. In math the word distribute means “to give or use in another way.” We then wrote a sample problem on the board: 7 x 4. We then drew that problem as an array (7 rows of 4 items in each row). We then broke the array into a 5 x 4 and a 2 x 4 array. This shows that, together, the two smaller arrays equal one large array.

As students progress in their work with multiplication, they can apply more strategies to complex problems. By learning the Distributive Property, they gain a stronger conceptual understanding of number sense and the operation of multiplication, giving them greater recall with known facts. While the Distributive Property does emphasize conceptual understanding, it can also be challenging for students. Please note that even though this is one strategy for multiplication, it does not take away from the importance of memorizing our math facts. Continue to drill those facts at home :). Thank you for your continued support and help with new and more challenging material.


Reading/Writing:

Thank you to everyone who attended our Fairy Tale Performances this past week. The kids had an absolute blast performing for you and some of our younger QP friends. Both Erin and I took video footage of each performance. I will be finishing uploading those this week. When they are done, I’ll put them to classroom website.

During the month of October, the students will be reading mystery books and writing mystery stories. We have mixed up the 3A and 3B students to read in groups together. We have over 10 different stories that are being read. Make sure to ask your child what he/she is reading.

For writing this month, the students are in for a real treat! If you have never heard of the book The Mysteries of Harris Burdick get ready to fall in love! Here is what our “mystery” writing prompt is all about:

Introduction by Chris Van Allsburg:

“I first saw the drawings in this book a year ago, in the home of a man named Peter Wenders. Though Mr. Wenders is retired now, he once worked for a children’s book publisher, choosing the stories and pictures that would be turned into book. Thirty years ago a man called at Peter Wenders’ office, introducing himself as Harris Burdick. Mr. Burdick explained that he had written fourteen stories and had drawn many pictures for each one. He’d brought with him just one drawing from each story, along with the title of the story and a small caption.” (The Mysteries of Harris Burdick) 

The most interesting twist to this story is that Mr. Burdick left the images with Peter Wenders and never returned to share the rest of his stories. In 1984, Chris Van Allsburg visited Wenders’ office and was captivated by the drawings and captions. So, the two of them decided that maybe if Chris Van Allsburg repurposed the drawings they could discover who Mr. Harris Burdick was! Ultimately, they never learned who Mr. Burdick was; however, the images (some bizarre, funny, and scary) have engaged children and adults for many years!

So what does this have to do with our newest writing prompt? The students are creating mysteries to go along with the engaging pictures from The Mysteries of Harris Burdick! At the beginning of last week the students chose the image that captivated them the most. This week they started writing their first drafts for their mysteries. We talked about how all mysteries have a main character that is placed in interesting settings with a puzzle to solve! 

Make sure to ask your child what picture your child chose for his/her mystery! Also, if you are looking for fun songs and stories that follow the Mysteries of Harris Burdick book, check out the website below:

http://www.houghtonmifflinbooks.com/features/harrisburdick/inspired_by_burdick.html


Science with Ms. Schuenemann:

Before heading off the the Cave of the Mounds, 3rd graders dug deep into the topic of caves. Students looked at the various types of caves and how each type is formed. Students compared and contrasted the different types of caves. Then, we began talking about different formations in our solution caves, such as stalactites and stalagmites. It was awesome seeing students apply this knowledge and understanding once they got to the cave! This week we will continue to talk about the impact of erosion on Earth’s surface. Here are some review questions to ask your child:

  • What are the different types of caves? (solution/limestone caves, wind caves, glacial caves, sea caves, lava caves, and lava tubes)
  • What type of cave was at the Cave of the Mounds? (solution/limestone cave)
  • How are solution/limestone caves formed? (Rain seeps through the rock and carbon dioxide from the air helps dissolve the rock creating a hollow over time.)


Social Studies:

Due to our fairy tale plays, as well as our field trip to Cave of the Mounds, we had a short week for social studies / science. As I mentioned in our last week’s newsletter, our newest unit focuses on the geography of different communities. Most communities have unique landforms and bodies of water. These features influence how people live, work, and have fun. During our newest social studies unit, the students will learn about geography. This is one of my favorite social studies units of the year, as it is incredibly hands-on and engaging! We started the unit by creating a KWL poster. KWLs are posters where the students share what they know about a subject, what the want to learn about a subject, and ultimately “what we learned” about learned. The students shared that they knew about mountains, lakes, oceans, canyons, and other commonly known landforms. The students then shared that they want to learn how the weather affects geography, different and more unique forms of landforms (like glaciers and caves), and also how our earth has changed since its creation.

We then watched a short introduction video that shared with the students some of the big concepts they mentioned during the KWL. I have placed a link to the clip below if you want to watch the video as a family this weekend or any other time during the unit. http://https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BsqKTJtK_vw


Religion:

October is the month of the Rosary. “The month of October is dedicated to the Holy Rosary. According to an account by fifteenth-century Dominican, Alan de la Roch, Mary appeared to St. Dominic in 1206...Mary praised him for his valiant fight against the heretics and then gave him the Rosary, explained its uses and efficacy, and told him to preach it to others.” (CatholicCulture.org)

This upcoming week the students will be studying the Rosary and then praying it together with the students in 3A. We will be doing this later in the month, so if you would like to send a Rosary to school with your child that would be wonderful. Please try to have the Rosaries to school no later than Monday, October 14. The Rosaries will stay at school over the course of the entire month of October.


Spelling:

Continue to use www.spellingcity.com as resource for your child’s weekly spelling list. Our newest spelling words focus on one syllable words that contain the long i sound.

Here are our new words:

  • New Words: math, toast, easy, socks, friday, stuff, paid, cheese, june, elbow, program, shiny, piles, sticky
  • Review Words: each, both
  • Challenge Words: comb, holiday, detail, echoes 


In Conclusion:

Make sure to check out our photo gallery for more pictures from third grade. Also, make sure to check the “Get in Touch” page for educational websites, fun links, and updated information regarding the Fairy Tale videos. Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.


Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

[email protected]

Love in Every Word, Respect in Every Action, Confidence in Every Heart. 

September 23-27, 2019

Posted by [email protected] on September 30, 2019 at 10:15 AM Comments comments (0)

A Cooler Week!

The students and teachers at QP were so appreciative for the change in weather! We certainly had a warm spell, so this “cooler” weather is a nice change of pace (plus, the mosquitoes have died down). It looks like Monday and Tuesday will be “warmer,” but the tail end of the upcoming week will be good, fall weather. Make sure to send your child with sweaters/jackets to school.

In other news, our Fun Run took place this last Friday. Thank you to everyone who came out to support this kids AND for those of you who donated to our school and incredible causes.


Field Trip:

If you have not yet sent in your child’s field trip permission forms, please do so. They were due by Friday. Here is the list of parent chaperones in 3B: Denise Damato, Laura Lalik, Katelyn Klein, Kathy Diehl, Jodi Pahs, Michael Block, and Colleen Kenney. We are HOPING to eat at Cave of the Mounds; however, the weather looks like it may prevent us from doing that. We will still be visiting the cave regardless of rain, so please dress appropriately! Since we may be eating back at school (in our classrooms), please do your best to avoid sending food with nuts. Thank you for understanding! Also, ALL COLD LUNCH MUST BE SENT IN A DISPOSABLE BAG!

If you are a parent chaperone please read the following information:

Basic Itinerary for October 5, 2018:

  • 8:20 AM (approximately) Students leave Our Lady Queen of Peace School (parents meet at Cave of the Mounds)
  • 8:50 AM (approximately) Arrive at Cave of the Mounds and meet parent chaperones
  • 8:50-9:00 AM (Pending arrival) Eat a quick snack (provided by teachers) and get into field trip groups.
  • 9:00-10:00 AM SpeleoQUEST program--Exploring the formation of caves
  • 10:00-11:30 AM Cave Tour
  • 11:30 AM-12:00 PM Bathroom breaks and lunch at picnic tables (weather pending.)
  • 12:00 PM Leave Cave of the Mounds
  • 12:30 PM Arrive back at Our Lady Queen of Peace School

Here is what we did in third grade this week:

 

Math:

During our math lessons this year, the students have used different mathematical practices to solve word problems. This week, we had an opportunity to stop and focus on the “thinking habits” that problem solvers use when they model word equations.

Here is a sample world problem that the students were given this week: At the pet store, Sarah bought a hamster that cost $10. He also bought 5 mice at $4 each. How much money did Sarah spend in all?

The first thing we did in order to develop strong “thinking habits” was to figure out what we needed to know in order to determine how much Sarah spent at the pet store. (We need to know how much Sarah spent on hamsters and on mice.) Then, we determined what operations we could use to solve the problem. (We can use addition and multiplication. First we multiply to find the costs of the hamster and the mice. Then we add the two products.) 

Some problems have more than one step, or even hidden questions that must be answered first. Our lessons this week emphasized the application of the math facts we have learned thus far. By applying a variety of mathematical practices to a diverse number of multiplication problems, students are able to show that they have gained conceptual understanding of multiplication. 

Next week we will start learning new math facts (such as 6s, 7s, and 8s). I will also be sending home some practice “time tests” for you as a family. As mentioned in my last newsletter, we ultimately want our students to develop a mastery of their multiplication math facts. Continued practice at home really helps reinforce what is learned at school. Continue to work on the math facts that I sent home last week, and also look for the new math fact triangles and math fact sheets that get sent home next week.


Reading / Writing:

This week the students completed our fairy tale unit. The students read between 6-10 different fairy tales and folktales (depending on size and difficulty). Make sure to ask your child some of the following questions about the books that were read:

  • Which fairy tale or folktale was you favorite book?
  • What are some examples from the book that show why you feel this way?
  • What is one “moral” or life lesson that you learned from the book?
  • Why is it important for us to learn and live out the moral of the story? 

Just a reminder that the kids are performing on Monday and Wednesday for the last hour of the day. Kids are not provided costumes here at school, as the goal is for the kids to use their imagination :). If a child wants to bring in props he/she may :).

Here is the 3B students and the days that they are performing for our fairy tale performances:. 

  • Monday, September 30 (1-2pm): Keira, Mason, Alex, Will, Bentley, Gigi, Noah, Madeline, Pryor, Landon, Abby, Jack N, and Sam
  • Wednesday, October 2 (2-3pm): Greta, Oscar, Michael, Josiah, Elliott, Daniella, Beckett, Fallon, Max, Gwen, Layla, Jack K, and Ian


Social Studies:

This past week we finished unit 1 by taking our first social studies test. I was blown away by their performance! Tests were sent home with your child. Our newest social studies unit focuses on communities and geography. We will be learning about different natural resources, how to protect our environment, and different landforms across the United States. Here are some questions you can ask your child to prepare for the next unit:

  • What are natural resources and what kinds of natural resources can be found in Wisconsin?
  • How do you think geography affects people’s lives in different communities?
  • How do you think people adapt to and modify the physical environment of their communities?


Science with Ms. Schuenemann: 

Last week, students took the Unit 1 science test. Students put a lot of time and effort into studying for the test and their hard work paid off. Following the test, I wanted to make sure that everyone had some background knowledge on caves before our field trip. We had a brief discussion about the different types of caves which include, sea caves, glacier caves, lava caves, wind caves, and solution caves. The students learned that the Cave of the Mounds is a great example of a solution cave. A solution cave can be formed when rainwater mixes with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This causes the rain to be slightly acidic. When the rain water meets limestone (or another dissolvable rock/mineral), the rock begins to erode and eventually form a cave. Our next unit of study will cover habitats, heredity and change over time. Some of the big questions we will explore in this topic are:

  • How are plants and animals from the past similar or different from current plants, animals, and environments?
  • What happens to organisms when their environment changes?
  • How can animals increase their survivability?



Religion:

This week the students learned that the Church is a community for all people who believe in God and follow Jesus. The word church comes from a word meaning “a gathering of people called by God.” From the beginning, God called humans to share in his life. Jesus initiated the Church and established the Reign of God. The students also learned that the word church has other meanings as well. It refers to the Eucharist assembly. In its largest sense, the Church means the universal Church throughout the world. 

Third grade is a time when the social group often becomes important to children. As I mentioned during our open house, they want to know that they belong and have friends. As a result, this is the perfect age to talk about the Church and school and communities of faith. It’s especially important that third graders have time to spend with peers at church and are able to form friendships in their school and parish communities.


Spelling:

This week our new spelling words are simple words with the long i sound. In the list the long i is spelt with an i, igh, or ie. Continue to use www.spellingcity.com as resource for your child’s weekly spelling list.

Here are our new words:

  • New Words: slight, mild, sight, pie, mind, tie, pilot, might, lie, tight, blind, flight, dies, midnight
  • Review Words: find, night
  • Challenge Words: silent, frightening, stands, score 


In Conclusion:

Thank you again for a wonderful week. It is truly a joy having your children in my class. Let me know if you have any questions or comments.

Mrs. Robyn Bernecker

[email protected]

Love in Every Word, Respect in Every Action, Confidence in Every Heart.



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